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No Party to Violence: Analyzing Violence Against Women in Political Parties

No Party to Violence: Analyzing Violence Against Women in Political Parties uses 12 items that measure levels of violence faced by politically active women in political parties. The items are separated into five themes: perceptions regarding women’s access to party leadership positions, climate of violence inside political parties, their experiences with violence, its reporting and subsequent impact.

Categories

Geographies Tested: Cote d'Ivoire,Honduras,Tanzania,Tunisia

Populations Included: Female, Male

Age Range: Adults

Items:

Perceptions regarding women’s access to party leadership positions

1.How do women generally get promoted or gain leadership positions in the party?

Response Options:
Merit
Quotas
Good Campaigner
ConnectionsFamily
Being a Woman
Pay bribes
Sexual Favor

Climate of violence inside political parties

2.Have you ever witnessed someone in your party using violence or the threat of violence against another member of your political party to control or persuade them?

Response Options:
Any
Verbal Abuse
Psychological Attacks
Threats & Coercion
Physical Violence
Sexual Harassment

3.Do you believe it is acceptable for party members or leaders to engage in the following behavior in certain situations? (Percentage answering ‘acceptable’ or ‘sometimes acceptable’)

Response Options:
Disqualify based on appearance
Defame opponent
Threaten regarding policy stand
Sideline based on gender
Spread altered images
Withhold resources
Harass on social media
Turn off microphone
Request sexual favours

4.Do you think that men or women are more likely to be the victims of violence in the party?

Response Options:
Women
Men
Both
Don’t Know

Women’s experiences with violence inside political parties

5.Have you ever experienced any of the following types of violence while carrying out your political party functions?

Response Options:
Any violence
Psychological violence
Threats & coercion
Economic violence
Sexual violence
Physical violence

6.Since you entered politics, how many times have you experienced any of these situations?

Response Options:
Many times
Sometimes
Rarely
Never

7.If yes, which of the following positions or roles were you holding when the incident occurred?

Response Options:
Party official
Candidate
Aspirant
MemberVolunteer
Women’s Wing
ElectedAppointed Official

8.If yes, who committed the incident against you?

Response Options:
Party member
Party leader
Family member
Party elected official

9.If yes, when did you experience the incident?

Response Options:
NominationCampaign period
Internal party meeting
Public party event
Parliament session
Violent conflict
Other

Women’s reporting of violence inside political parties

10.If yes, who did you tell or report the incident to?

Response Options:
No one
Competent party authority
Women’s organization
Female party member
Male party member
Police
Family Member

11.If you chose to report the incident you experienced, were there any consequences for the perpetrator(s)?

Response Options:
None
Required to apologize
Public reprimand
Private reprimand
Sanctioned
Kicked out of party
Other

The impact of violence against women in political parties

12.If you chose to report the incident you experienced, were there any consequences for you because you reported it?

Response Options:
None
More violence
Lost nomination
Lost prestige
Ostracized in party

Scoring Procedures

Not Applicable

Original Citation

Krook, M. L., & Hubbard, C. (2018). No Party to Violence: Analyzing Violence Against Women in Political Parties – Compendium Report of Country Pilots in Côte d’Ivoire, Honduras, Tanzania, and Tunisia. National Democratic Institute. https://www.ndi.org/sites/default/files/2019%20VAW-PP%20Compendium%20Report.pdf

Psychometric Score

Citation Frequency

Ease of Use Score

Formative Research

Qualitative Research

Existing Literature/Theoretical Framework

Field Expert Input

Cognitive Interviews / Pilot Testing

Reliability

Internal

Test-retest

Interrater

Validity

Content

Face

Criterion (gold-standard)

Construct

Ease of Use

Readability

Scoring Clarity

Length

KEY